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9 edition of Aspect and modality in Kwa languages found in the catalog.

Aspect and modality in Kwa languages

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Published by John Benjamins Pub. Co. in Amsterdam, Philadelphia .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Kwa languages

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by Felix K. Ameka, Mary Esther Kropp Dakubu.
    SeriesStudies in language companion series -- 100
    ContributionsAmeka, Felix K., Kropp Dakubu, M. E.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPL8424 .A84 2008
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16428258M
    ISBN 109789027205674
    LC Control Number2008002762

    Aspect and Modality in Kwa Languages, Studies in Language Comparison Series. Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins. If the book has more than one author or editor, they should all be given, the first appearing as above, the others with their first name or initial placed before the surname: Heine, Bernd and Derek Nurse, eds. Author: in Chief. Name Origin: Kwa means 'man' or 'person' in several Kwa languages.. Overview and Distribution. The Kwa family (or branch) is part of the Niger-Congo phylum.. It consists of some 50 languages spoken by about 25 million people in the west coast of Africa from Ivory Coast to western Nigeria, particularly in southeastern Ivory Coast, south Ghana, south Togo and south Benin.

    : Modality and Structure in Signed and Spoken Languages (): Richard Meier: Books. Ewe [] Noun []. tsi. water (including in the form of a river or rain) dé asi tsi me — put one's hand in the water. , Aspect and Modality in Kwa Languages →ISBN, pages and mia-nyrɔ-e ɖé tɔ-a me né wò-a-no tsi kú 1PL:1RR-immerse-3SG ALL river-DEF LINK 3SG-1RR-drink water die We should immerse him in the river so that he would drown.

    constitutes a complete description of aspect and modality in Ewe. 1 The non-prominence of tense in Ewe In Ewe, like in many ot her Kwa languages of West Africa, there is no overtAuthor: Felix K. Ameka. the same subject and tense-aspect-modality categories, while only one of the verbs is marked for these categories and conjunctive markings are lacking. Serial verb constructions typically express the consecutive or simultaneous aspect of the actions of the verbs. Languages (non-creole) exhibiting serialization: Niger-Congo (North and South) Kwa.


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Aspect and modality in Kwa languages Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Aspect and modality in Kwa languages. [Felix K Ameka; M E Kropp Dakubu;] -- This book explores the thesis that in the Kwa languages of West Africa, aspect and modality are more central to Aspect and modality in Kwa languages book grammar of the verb than tense.

Where tense marking has emerged it is invariably in. This book explores the thesis that in the Kwa languages of West Africa, aspect and modality are more central to the grammar of the verb than tense. Where tense marking has emerged it is invariably in the expression of the future, and therefore concerned with the impending actualization or potentiality of an event, hence with modality, rather Pages: This book explores the thesis that in the Kwa languages of West Africa, aspect and modality are more central to the grammar of the verb than tense.

Where tense marking has emerged it is invariably in the expression of the future, and therefore concerned with the impending actualization or potentiality of an event, hence with modality, rather Cited by: This book explores the thesis that in the Kwa languages of West Africa, aspect and modality are more central to the grammar of the verb than tense.

Where tense marking has emerged it is invariably in the expression of the future, and therefore concerned with the impending actualization or potentiality of an event, hence with modality, rather than the purely temporal sequencing associated with.

Description: This book explores the thesis that in the Kwa languages of West Africa, aspect and modality are more central to the grammar of the verb than tense. Where tense marking has emerged it is invariably in the expression of the future, and therefore concerned with the impending actualization or potentiality of an event, hence with.

Entdecken Sie "Aspect and Modality in Kwa Languages" von Kropp Dakubu Mary Esther Kropp Dakubu und finden Sie Ihren Buchhändler. This book explores the thesis that in the Kwa languages of West Africa, aspect and modality are more central to the grammar of the verb than tense.

Where tense marking has emerged it is invariably in the expression of the future, and therefore concerned with the. Aspect and modality in Kwa Languages. Abstract. This book explores the thesis that in the Kwa languages of West Africa, aspect and modality are more central to the grammar of the verb than tense.

Where tense marking has emerged it is invariably in the expression of the future, and therefore concerned with the impending actualization or Cited by: Kwa languages, a branch of the Niger-Congo language family consisting of 45 languages spoken by approximately 20 million people in the southern areas of Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Togo, and Benin and in the extreme southwestern corner of Nigeria.

The Kwa languages are divided into two groups. The larger Nyo group comprises 35 languages situated in southern Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana. Aspect and Modality in Kwa Languages Published by John Benjamins. Published This book explores the thesis that in the Kwa languages of West Africa, aspect and modality are more central to the grammar of the verb than tense.

The Kwa languages, often specified as New Kwa, are a proposed but as-yet-undemonstrated family of languages spoken in the south-eastern part of Ivory Coast, across southern Ghana, and in central name was introduced by Gottlob Krause and derives from the word for 'people' (Kwa) in many of these languages, as illustrated by Akan namesGeographic distribution: Ivory Coast, Ghana, and Togo.

This typological tenet is investigated in a variety of languages from Indo-European (German, Slavic, Armenian), African, Asian, Amerindian, and Creoles. Seeming deviations and idiosyncrasies in the interaction between aspect and modality turn out to be highly : This book explores the thesis that in the Kwa languages of West Africa, aspect and modality are more central to the grammar of the verb than tense.

Where tense marking has emerged it is invariably in the expression of the future, and therefore concerned with the impending actualization or potentiality of an event, hence with modality, rather. Tense–aspect–mood (commonly abbreviated tam) or tense–modality–aspect (abbreviated as tma) is a group of grammatical categories that covers the expression of tense (location in time), aspect (fabric of time – a single block of time, continuous flow of time, or repetitive occurrence), and mood or modality (degree of necessity, obligation, probability, ability).

This book covers the essentials of modality and offers both foundational ideas and cutting edge advances. The book consists of what are essentially tutorials on modality and modal notions, covering definitions of modality, morphosyntactic form, conceptual and logical semantics, historical development, and acquisition.

There are also specific chapters on modality in Zapotec and American Sign. Mood, Aspect, Modality Revisited offers a significant focus on the subjunctive and modality in relation to tense and aspect, a very intriguing topic that deserves more attention in the field.

The chapters are thematically related in an interesting way, and the contributors are eminent scholars in Brand: University of Chicago Press.

Search result for felix-k-ameka: Catching Language(), Catching Language(), Aspect and Modality in Kwa Languages(), etc books - Free Download ebooks. Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection.

Aspect and modality in Ewe: A M. Kropp (eds.), Aspect and modality in Kwa languages, pp. – Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Ameka, Felix K. and Breedveld, Anneke. Areal cultural scripts for social interaction in West African.

Modality-aspect interfaces: implications and typological solutions / edited by Werner Abraham and Elisabeth Leiss. (Typological Studies in Language, issn ; v. 79) Includes bibliographical references and index. Modality (Linguistics) 2. Grammar, Comparative and general--Aspect.

Typology (Linguistics) I. Abraham, Werner. The discussion on the pre-verbal elements highlighted in the preceding chapter is incorporated into each of the aspect and modality systems.

Aspect As a category, tense is a rather bastardised phenomenon in contemporary Ghanaian linguistics, especially in respect of current research on Kwa languages. Ameka (), for instance, asserts that. Modality and structure in signed and spoken languages The realization that signed languages are true languages is one of the great discoveries of the last thirty years of linguistic research.

The work of many sign language researchers has revealed deep similarities between signed and. The potential morpheme in Ewe Aspect and Modality in Kwa languages J Essegbey On argument structure and the lexical expression of syntactic relations In: Bromberger (ed) The view from Building   This chapter discusses the “phonology–syntax interface”.

It shows that the Kwa languages are tone languages like most West African languages. As such they use suprasegmatals (tonemes) in addition to phonemes to form by: 8.tree diagrams of ‘Eastern Kwa’ and ‘Western Kwa’ provide a helpful genetic context of each language discussed in the book.

The editors’ Chapter 1, ‘The phonology syntax interface’ (pp. 1–9), mentions that almost all Kwa languages have two or three ‘basic tones’ .